How Attorneys Market Themselves Online

law firm marketing case studiesAfter conducting several case studies with attorneys, I’ve determined that there isn’t just one way to get the word out about your law firm’s services. In fact, your best bet is to get as creative as you can with your marketing while staying on message to attract your ideal client.

Here’s what a few attorneys I’ve spoken to in recent months have said:

John Fisher on E-mail Marketing

Most attorneys are looking for instant gratification. They’re not thinking long term, but long term is where the real value is.

So my strategy is to share valuable free content that will help lawyers. I’m not selling the book. I’m not soliciting stuff or asking them to buy something. I offer free advice on how to build their practice. If you want to buy the book or discuss a consultation, then here’s my number. I’ll include that. But that makes up about 5% of my autoresponse messaging strategy. The other 95% is providing free information that is helpful to my audience.

Greg Guedel on Publishing a Book

I think if you have the opportunity, go traditional. Traditional publishers have the means of getting a book out far and wide. But if you can’t find anyone to do it, then I would recommend self-publishing. Why not? Sometimes, publishers might not be in tune with what people in a particular niche want. So if you have the means and you can’t find a publisher, then you can go the self-publishing route.

Dana Shultz on Writing His Blog

When I answer a question, I write the same way I speak to my clients. This is important because a lot of lawyers seem not to get it. Business people, especially small business people, don’t want to read a legal treatise. They have a business problem and they want to know the legal ramifications of the problem. If they want a recommendation, I’ll give a recommendation, but they want the easy solution, not a long legal treatise.

Jim Hart on Free E-book Downloads

My divorce guide is a 50-60 page e-book. Your download needs to be information that your prospect can actually use. It needs to be information they can use when talking to an attorney, such as questions they might have about the legal process along with answers, or things they can put to practical use, like how to find the right divorce attorney. Build into that document information that is substantive and valuable. Build your platform around that.

Dave Gormley on Google+ Business Pages

We have two offices and a brand page for each. The reason we set up two pages is so we would show up on the map for searches for Lexington Park and for Waldorf. We share a blog post from our website and push it out to our pages. Originally, we were not going to have the firm comment or share posts, be we decided that it doesn’t hurt to have our pages show a little personality.

David Barrett on Social Media

When potential clients Google a lawyer, a lot of times they’ll find his LinkedIn profile or his profile on another social media channel. It’s still a benefit because it acts as social proof. If you have enough connections or a profile that demonstrates your expertise and samples of your work, then a potential client can see if you are the attorney they want to hire.

Christian Denmon on Directories

Directory-wise, I get a very good return from AVVO. I do lead tracking, answer legal questions, and also do some advertising, as well. My return is pretty good. I’ve done Lawyers.com for a couple of years, but it’s not very good. I’ve got a couple of cases, a couple of good cases, but it’s not as good as AVVO. AVVO is probably the best as far as directories go. In rural settings, it’s the Yellow Pages.

Mitch Jackson on Pinterest

It’s important to engage other people on Pinterest. So you should use the options that Pinterest has to offer to help you share pins, comment on other people’s pins, answer questions consumers have about the law, and to dive into the platform. You want to become a part of the platform to develop a reputation as someone who answers questions. I normally try to direct people back to Twitter, Spreechat, my law firm website, or somewhere else for a follow-up dialogue. Telephone is even better. It’s a great way to connect with people. We do it by telephone, Skype, Spreechat, or Google+ Hangouts. Any of those are good communication mediums where we can connect with people on a deeper level.

Gordon Firemark on YouTube Video Production

Plenty of light makes even a mediocre camera look pretty good. The camera has to be HD for it to be top quality. Most modern digital cameras are good enough. The iPhone 5 has a fantastic video camera and you can get adapters, a wireless microphone, and other add-ons. It depends on how much money you want to spend. You can spend a lot of money or produce a good video with just $100 worth of equipment.

Where To Find The Complete Case Studies

Each of these attorneys shares deeper insights into law firm marketing at James Toolbox. Read all of these case studies and learn how to market your law firm better.

Disclosure: James Publishing paid me to conduct these case studies. I make no money on anyone signing up with James Toolbox or doing business with James Publishing.

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Allen Taylor
Allen Taylor
Allen Taylor is a freelance writer, content strategist, and award-winning journalist. He is the author of "E-book Publishing: Create Your Own Brand of Digital Books," available in the Kindle, ePub, iBooks, and PDF formats.

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